Controversial NextGen Journal Piece: ‘Every Social Media Manager Should Be Under 25′

Controversial NextGen Journal Piece: ‘Every Social Media Manager Should Be Under 25′

 

 
 

A rather controversial issue raised by Sloane (2012) about the appropriate age for a manager in the social media sphere has been extensively discussed by the public of both age groups below and above 25 years. Even though majority of the discussants have disagreed with the proposed idea that managers in the social media companies should be young to most effectively target the audience’s needs, yet some of the “old” professionals found this idea quite reasonable.

For example, Kevin Hillstrom agrees that there is a need for the young social media managers in some cases. Hillstrom currently owns personal business (“MineThatData”). Before that he has worked as a vice president of database marketing for the Nordstrom, as a director of circulation, as analyst at Eddie Bauer Company, and also as a manager of analytical services at the Lands’ End. He made comments that for certain groups of social media companies, ideas of Sloane could be rather profitable.

Based on his experience and previous analysis, there is evidence that people above 30 usually use social media for other purposes than younger customers that often make transactions with the help of social media. These observations outline a fundamental difference between the behaviors of users who are of different age groups. Thus, this is one of the reasons where separation of generations appears. Majority of the social media clients are using services of those companies in order to increase their profits and sales while this does not match with the “baby boom” audience.

Therefore, in the situation when social media companies are targeted at the audiences who are above 30 years old and who are less likely make purchases with the help of the social media, unlike young people, then hiring a social media manager who is younger than 25 years may considerably improve the situation.

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